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NEWS FROM SOUTH SNOHOMISH COUNTY FIRE & RESCUE

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Leslie Hynes
Public Information Officer
Office: 425-551-1243
Cell: 425-754-7273

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South Snohomish County
Fire & Rescue


Edmonds townhouse fire displaces family of six

Post Date:01/27/2017 12:14 PM
Townhouse FireA family of six is safe, but will have to find a new place to live after an early morning fire caused more than $100,000 damage to their Edmonds townhouse.

Neighbors called 911 shortly after 3 a.m. to report the fire in a 7-unit townhouse building in the 7400 block of 212th St. SW. “Two men from neighboring units were alerted to the fire when their smoke alarms sounded. They pounded on the door of the townhouse where the fire was burning to wake the family. They also went door-to-door to the other units in the building to make sure everyone evacuated,” said Leslie Hynes, public information officer for Snohomish County Fire District 1, which provides fire service in the City of Edmonds.

All residents safely evacuated. There were no injuries. Firefighters had the fire under control within 10 minutes. Damage was contained to the townhouse unit where the fire started. The Red Cross and Support 7 are assisting the family – four adults and two children – displaced by the fire. They were renting and did not have insurance.  Residents of the other townhouses in the building were able to return to their homes following the fire.

Fire investigators determined the fire was accidental and started on the stovetop.

“We’re thankful to the neighbors who made sure all residents safely evacuated the building,” Hynes said. “A fire at this time of the morning when most people are asleep has the potential to be deadly. Smoke alarms can give you the early warning you need to get out safely in a fire.”

Residents in the fire unit told investigators their smoke alarm went off, but sounded muffled. To keep smoke alarms in good working order, fire officials recommend:
• Testing monthly.
• Replacing batteries twice a year or when the alarm chirps indicating a low battery.
• Replacing smoke alarms more than 10 years old.


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