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MAY: Work, school and community

Disasters can happen at any time. If you are away from home, do you know where to find safe shelter locations? Do you know what the emergency procedures are for your child’s school or for your workplace? Will people who count on you know what to do if you can’t reach them? In May, we are focusing on procedures for work, school and community, once again drawing from the Do1Thing website. Know how to make sure you and your loved ones are safe in a disaster, no matter where you are.

Week 4

Become acquainted with disaster preparedness programs from Fire District 1.

By Darrell Dorr

May 24, 2017

Disasters can happen at any time. If you are away from home, do you know where to find safe shelter locations? Do you know what the emergency procedures are for your child’s school or for your workplace? Will people who count on you know what to do if you can’t reach them? In May, we are focusing on procedures for work, school and community, once again drawing from the Do1Thing website. Know how to make sure you and your loved ones are safe in a disaster, no matter where you are.

Fire District 1 offers several programs to help our citizens and community to help prepare for disasters. Here's an overview of these programs. LEARN MORE ONLINE

Neighborhood Ambassador Workshops

Neighborhoods that are prepared for disasters save lives, reduce the severity of injuries and trauma and reduce property damage. Map Your Neighborhoods teaches neighbors to rely on each other during the hours or days before fire, medical, police or utility responders arrive. You can help Fire District 1 bring this program to your community by becoming a Neighborhood Ambassador Volunteer. Workshops are held on the third Wednesday of each month. Location varies.Our next workshop is June 21, 6-7:30 p.m., Silver Firs Station 13, 13611 Puget Park Dr., Everett

Community Emergency Response Team (CERT)

Following a major disaster, firefighters and other emergency service providers may not be able to meet the heavy demand for their services. People will have to rely on each other for help in order to meet their immediate lifesaving and life-sustaining needs. Community Emergency Response Team volunteers learn basic disaster preparedness skills so they can assist others during a disaster.

Fire Corps Volunteers

Fire Corps volunteers use their skills to help promote public safety and community preparedness. Fire District 1 is looking for people who can help with administrative tasks, public education, events and grant writing.

ReadySunday

ReadySunday brings community preparedness information to faith-based congregations in south Snohomish County. People often turn to their faith in times of crisis. ReadySunday provides resources to educate congregations on what they can do to prepare and support each other in a major disaster. To schedule a ReadySunday, contact Kristen Thorstenson.


Week 3

Give emergency kits to people who count on you.

By Darrell Dorr

May 18, 2017

Disasters can happen at any time. If you are away from home, do you know where to find safe shelter locations? Do you know what the emergency procedures are for your child’s school or for your workplace? Will people who count on you know what to do if you can’t reach them? In May, we are focusing on procedures for work, school and community, once again drawing from the Do1Thing website. Know how to make sure you and your loved ones are safe in a disaster, no matter where you are.

Put together basic emergency kits for people who may not be able to do so for themselves or for those who may not think of doing it for themselves. Show them what is in the kit and talk to them about disasters.

Make sure the kit meets their specific needs. For instance, if someone takes prescription medicine, include a list of medications and dosages. For a college student, make sure the kit is small enough to store in the space he or she has available.

Talk to your college student about how you will stay in touch if a disaster occurs. Make sure he understands that cell phones may not work during a disaster. Choose an emergency contact who does not live near you or the college. Arrange with your student to call that person if they can’t reach you during a disaster.


Week 2

Know how others in your community will respond in a disaster.

By Darrell Dorr

May 10, 2017

 Talk to other people when you are developing an emergency plan for a school, workplace or organization. Get input from people who work there and other people who use the building. It is especially important to include people with disabilities. Think about asking your local police and fire departments to review the plan. Make sure that what you are planning won’t interfere with emergency response.

Find out if your community has designated evacuation routes for floods or other disasters. Include that information in your plans. Make sure that the plans you develop will work for everyone.


 

Week 1

Make sure emergency procedures are in place for your workplace or school.

By Darrell Dorr

May 3, 2017

Talk to your employer about emergency plans for the building where you work. Think about other places that you and family members regularly spend time, like your child’s school. Talk to administrators at those places about their emergency plans.

Ways to be safe at work and school:

  • Make sure evacuation routes and shelter locations are marked on a map and posted in the building.
  • Hold emergency training and drills.
  • Help create an emergency kit for the facility.
  • Know where fire extinguishers and automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) are located.

ARCHIVE:  Catch up or review past blog posts

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